Glycine / Collagen (Gelatin) for Metabolic Health, Muscle, Tendon, Ligament Recovery and Strength




In this presentation I share how consuming glycine and/or collagen (gelatin) may be a cheap and potentially effective nutritional practice for augmenting muscle. tendon, ligament strength and recovery.

Though the context is climbing, this practice can be used before all training.

NOTE: I cannot put annotations on the video. But the last slide of my presentation details my use of daily glycine, and acute collagen before climbing training. Since currently most of my daily non-climbing training is done in the morning early, I do not consume anything. But I should have stipulated and would recommend collagen before any training session.

The presentation was derived from on-going article: http://useful.coach/articles/nutrition-for-soft-tissue-training-recovery-and-injury-prevention/

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10 thoughts on “Glycine / Collagen (Gelatin) for Metabolic Health, Muscle, Tendon, Ligament Recovery and Strength

  1. There was also a study I saw that proline and lysine can be beneficial to collagen growth but it was purely in vitro. I usually take 1g lysine and 1g proline with my 1g glycine

  2. Tom does caffeine have anything to do with suppressing collagen? I’ve been an espresso drinker these past two years and restarted low weight bodybuilding, I got injured more in this period than I ever did when I was not drinking coffee, tendon injuries etc.. I looked up caffiene and collagen and got one study from 2014:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4206198/

    “This is the first study to our knowledge that reports caffeine-induced inhibition of collagen synthesis in human skin fibroblasts.”
    There was another one showing a similar effect on collagen in the liver and lung or something, am I reading into this wrong or maybe caffeine isn’t so good?

  3. You’re saying “that could potentially be the most optimal way of training your fingers – 3 sessions a day”. Is that enough rest for your tendons to rebuild though? How can it be optimal with so little rest? Very informative video! Thanks for putting this out!

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